A LIVING HISTORY BLOG.

18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Sunday, 1 October 2017

British Museum Shot Pouch. Undated!


 Museum number
Am1991,09.4
Full: Front
Rectangular flat pouch or bag, with strap, fingerwoven of wool. The flat bag is constructed from one or two pieces of red wool plaited cloth, with a central resist [undyed] paler horizontal stripe across the front. The vertical edges include black wool.


Rectangular flat pouch or bag, with strap, fingerwoven of wool. The flat bag is constructed from one or two pieces of red wool plaited cloth, with a central resist [undyed] paler horizontal stripe across the front. The vertical edges include black wool, with a line of opaque white beads and stitching in a brown vegetal thread. The bottom seam also includes stitching in a brown vegetal thread, with a line of quill wrapped wool fringing, each ending in a red hair filled metal comb, the colour of the quills being alternating black and white bands. The front of the bag is further decorated, just above the resist dyed strip, with a further fringe similar to that at the bottom. Woven into the front of the bag is a geometric design in irregular opaque white beads: two vertical lines of chevrons, with a double zig zag line up the centre and single zig-zag lines up both vertical edges. The points of the chevrons face downwards. The back and less faded side of the bag is decorated with a double row, vertical, each of butterfly-like geometric designs, each row being 3 high; the vertical seams each have rows of five small diamonds. All the patterns are in the same opaque white glass beads. The top of the bag is edged with green tape, enclosed in lines of white beads, back and front. The bag is lined with a coarse reddish manufactured cloth. // The strap is also plaited, in two greenish colours, that at the edge being slightly yellower than the reddish green colour of the body of the strap. The strap is attached by sewing with the brown vegetable thread at the two top corners of the pouch opening. The strap finishes on both sides with a plaited wool fringe, on the left [from the front] with six plaits, and on the right with five plaits. Woven into these plaits or braids are white beads, incorporating slightly darker green wool. The main body of the strap incorporates in the weaving a diamond pattern of white beads, with along the slightly contrasting colour edges, rows of white beads, at the absolute edge and at the boundary between the two colours. Repairs to the beadwork seem to have been carried out with this darker green wool.


Wednesday, 20 September 2017

The Flintlock Fusil.

Help Dave get his guns back


David Dunstan is a farmer from the NSW town of Bungowannah. 

At 3:30am on Thursday 14th September, a man armed with a knife and piece of wood knocked on his back door.

David grabbed his unloaded 22 rifle to confront him - aware that the man had earlier confronted one if his neighbours who scared him off with a hockey stick. Dave managed to convince the man to sit in his car and drive him to the police station, while his wife called the police.

The police met David halfway down his driveway and placed his unwelcome guest under arrest.

The problem is, the police paid David another visit later in the morning to take his guns off him!

We've been working with David to try and see what can be done.  So we're starting this campaign to help him hire a lawyer who specialises in NSW firearms legislation to get his guns back.

We'd like to go further - we reckon he should be compensated for the loss of his firearms, not for his benefit, but to make a stand against this type of treatment by NSW Police.

So please help our campaign to help David get the legal representation he needs - and score a win on behalf of all shooters.
Help spread the word!